NBER


The NBER Reporter 2019 Number 4: Program Meetings



Asset Pricing
Behavioral Finance
Chinese Economy
Corporate Finance
Development Economics/BREAD
Economic Fluctuations and Growth
Education
Entrepreneurship


Health Care
International Finance and Macroeconomics
International Trade and Investment
Labor Studies
Market Design
Monetary Economics
Organizational Economics
Political Economy
Public Economics

Chinese Economy

Members of the NBER's Chinese Economy Working Group met September 26–27 in Cambridge. Research Associates Nancy Qian of Northwestern University, Shang-Jin Wei of Columbia University, and Daniel Xu of Duke University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Jing Cai, University of Maryland and NBER, and Adam Szeidl, Central European University, "Direct and Indirect Effects of Financial Access on SMEs"

    Li Feng and Haofei Wang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Jun Qian and Lei Zhu, Fudan University, "Stock Pledged Loans, Capital Markets, and Firm Performance: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly"

    Alain de Janvry and Elisabeth Sadoulet, University of California, Berkeley; Guojun He, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Shaoda Wang, University of Chicago; and Qiong Zhang, Renmin University of China, "Influence Activities and Bureaucratic Performance: Evidence from a Large-Scale Field Experiment in China"

    Daniel Berkowitz, University of Pittsburgh; Yi Lu, National University of Singapore; and Mingqin Wu, South China Normal University, "What Makes Local Governments More Accoutable? Evidence from a Website Reform"

    Hanming Fang, University of Pennsylvania and NBER; Linke Hou, Shandong University; Mingxing Liu and Pengfei Zhang, Peking University; and Lixin Colin Xu, The World Bank, "Factions, Local Accountability, and Long-Term Development: Theory and Evidence"

    Harald Hau and Difei Ouyang, University of Geneva, "Capital Scarcity and Industrial Decline: Evidence from 172 Real Estate Booms in China"

    John Ammer and John Rogers, Federal Reserve Board, and Gang Wang and Yang Yu, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, "The Value of Institutional Research: Fund Managers and Monetary Policy Expectations in China"

    Bei Qin, University of Hong Kong; David Stromberg, Stockholm University; and Yanhui Wu, University of Southern California, "Social Media, Information Networks, and Protests in China"

    Panle Jia Barwick and Shanjun Li, Cornell University and NBER; Liguo Lin, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics; and Eric Zou, Cornell University, "From Fog to Smog: The Value of Pollution Information"

    Yi Huang, The Graduate Institute, Geneva; Chen Lin, University of Hong Kong; Sibo Liu, Lingnan University; and Heiwai Tang, Johns Hopkins University, "Trade Networks and Firm Value: Evidence from the US-China Trade War"

Summaries of these papers are at
www.nber.org/conferences/2019/CEf19/summary.html

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Political Economy

Members of the NBER's Political Economy Program met October 11 in Cambridge. Research Associates Ernesto Dal Bó of the University of California, Berkeley and Francesco Trebbi of the University of British Columbia organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Meera Mahadevan, University of California, Santa Barbara, "The Price of Power: Costs of Political Corruption in Indian Electricity"

    Avinash Dixit, Princeton University, " 'We haven't got but one more day' — The Cuban Missile Crisis as a Dynamic Chicken Game"

    Michael Callen, University of California, San Diego and NBER; Saad Gulzar, Stanford University; Soledad A. Prillaman, University of Oxford; and Rohini Pande, Yale University and NBER, "Does Revolution Work? Post-Revolutionary Evolution of Nepal's Political Classes"

    Abhay Aneja, Stanford University, and Carlos Avenancio, Indiana University, "The Effect of Political Power on Labor Market Inequality: Evidence from the 1965 Voting Rights Act"

    Katherine Casey, Stanford University and NBER; and Abou Bakarr Kamara and Niccoló Meriggi, International Growth Centre, "An Experiment in Candidate Selection" (NBER Working Paper 26160)

    Camilo García-Jimeno, Emory University and NBER, and Alberto Ciancio, Population Studies Center, "The Political Economy of Immigration Enforcement: Conflict and Cooperation under Federalism" (NBER Working Paper 25766)

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/POLf19/summary.html

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Market Design

Members of the NBER's Market Design Working Group met October 18–19 in Cambridge. Research Associates Michael Ostrovsky of Stanford University and Parag A. Pathak of MIT organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Liran Einav, Stanford University and NBER; Amy Finkelstein, MIT and NBER; Yunan Ji, Harvard University; and Neale Mahoney, University of Chicago and NBER, "Voluntary Regulation: Evidence from Medicare Bundled Payments"

    Amanda Y. Agan, Rutgers University and NBER; Bo Cowgill, Columbia University; and Laura K. Gee, Tufts University, "Salary Disclosure and Hiring: Field Experimental Evidence from a Two-Sided Audit Study"

    Nicole Immorlica and Brendan Lucier, Microsoft Research; Jacob D. Leshno, University of Chicago; and Irene Y. Lo, Stanford University, "Information Acquisition Costs in Matching Markets"

    Christina Aperjis, Power Auctions LLC; Lawrence Ausubel, University of Maryland; and Oleg V. Baranov, University of Colorado Boulder, "Supply Reduction in the Broadcast Incentive Auction"

    Yannai A. Gonczarowski, Microsoft Research; Lior Kovalio and Noam Nisan, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and Assaf Romm, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Stanford University, "Matching for the Israeli ‘Mechinot' Gap-Year Programs: Handling Rich Diversity Requirements"

    Tayfun Sönmez and M. Bumin Yenmez, Boston College, "Affirmative Action in India via Vertical and Horizontal Reservations"

    Marek Pycia, University of Zurich, "Evaluating with Statistics: Which Outcome Measures Differentiate among Matching Mechanisms?"

    Daniel C. Waldinger, New York University, "Targeting In-Kind Transfers Through Market Design: A Revealed Preference Analysis of Public Housing Allocation"

    Joshua Angrist and Parag A. Pathak, MIT and NBER, and Roman Zarate, MIT, "Choice and Consequence: Assessing Mismatch at Chicago Exam Schools" (NBER Working Paper 26137)

    Mohammad Akbarpour, Stanford University; Julien Combe, University College London; Yinghua He, Rice University; Victor Hiller, Université Paris II; Robert Shimer, University of Chicago and NBER; and Olivier Tercieux, Paris School of Economics, "Unpaired Kidney Exchange: Overcoming Double Coincidence of Wants without Money"

    Gianluca Brero and Sven Seuken, University of Zurich, and Benjamin Lubin, Boston University, "Machine Learning-Powered Iterative Combinatorial Auctions"

    Nick Arnosti, Columbia University, and Peng Shi, University of Southern California, "Design of Lotteries and Waitlists for Affordable Housing Allocation"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/MDf19/summary.html

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Public Economics

Members of the NBER's Public Economics Program met October 24–25 in Chicago. Program Director Amy Finkelstein of MIT and Research Associate Neale Mahoney of the University of Chicago organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Hunt Allcott, New York University and NBER; Joshua J. Kim, Stanford University; Dmitry Taubinsky, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; and Jonathan Zinman, Dartmouth College and NBER, "Payday Lending, Self Control, and Consumer Protection"

    Patrick Bayer, Duke University and NBER; Peter Q. Blair, Harvard University and NBER; and Kenneth Whaley, Clemson University, "Is Spending on Schools Efficient? A National Study of the Capitalization of School Spending and Local Taxes"

    Joshua Rauh, Stanford University and NBER, and Ryan J. Shyu, Stanford University, "Behavioral Responses to State Income Taxation of High Earners: Evidence from California" (NBER Working Paper 26349)

    Nathaniel Hendren, Harvard University and NBER, and Benjamin D. Sprung-Keyser, Harvard University, "A Unified Welfare Analysis of Government Policies" (NBER Working Paper 26144)

    Michael Gelman, Claremont McKenna College; Shachar Kariv, University of California, Berkeley; Matthew D. Shapiro, University of Michigan and NBER; and Dan Silverman, Arizona State University and NBER, "Rational Illiquidity and the Marginal Propensity to Consume: Theory and Evidence from Income Tax Withholding and Refunds"

    Daniel C. Waldinger, New York University, "Targeting In-Kind Transfers Through Market Design: A Revealed Preference Analysis of Public Housing Allocation"

    Cailin R. Slattery, Columbia University, "Bidding for Firms: Subsidy Competition in the US."

    Juliana Londono-Velez, University of California, Los Angeles and NBER, "Can Wealth Taxation Work in Developing Countries? Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Colombia"

    Juan Carlos Suárez Serrato and Daniel Xu, Duke University and NBER; Xian Jiang, Duke University; Zhao Chen, Fudan University; and Zhikuo Liu, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, "Tax Policy and Lumpy Investment Behavior: Evidence from China's VAT Reform"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/PEf19/summary.html

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Economic Fluctuations and Growth

Members of the NBER's Economic Fluctuations and Growth Program met October 25 at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Research Associates Francisco J. Buera of the Washington University in St. Louis and Ayşegül Şahin of the University of Texas at Austin organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Monika Piazzesi and Martin Schneider, Stanford University and NBER; and Ciaran Rogers, Stanford University; "Money and Banking in a New Keynesian Model"

    Chang-Tai Hsieh, University of Chicago and NBER, and Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, Princeton University and NBER, "The Industrial Revolution in Services" (NBER Working Paper 25968)

    Giuseppe Moscarini, Yale University and NBER, and Fabien Postel-Vinay, University College London, "The Job Ladder: Inflation vs. Reallocation"

    Fernando E. Alvarez, University of Chicago and NBER, and David O. Argente, Pennsylvania State University, "Consumer Surplus of Alternative Payment Methods: Paying Uber with Cash"

    Maryam Farboodi, MIT and NBER, and Peter Kondor, London School of Economics, "Rational Sentiments and Economic Cycles"

    Martin Beraja, MIT and NBER; Rodrigo Adão, University of Chicago and NBER; and Nitya Pandalai-Nayar, University of Texas at Austin and NBER, "Technological Transitions with Skill Heterogeneity across Generations"


Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/EFGf19/summary.html

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International Finance and Macroeconomics

Members of the NBER's International Finance and Macroeconomics Program met October 25 in Cambridge. Research Associates Guido Lorenzoni of Northwestern University and Vivian Yue of Emory University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Chenzi Xu, Harvard University, "Reshaping Global Trade: The Immediate and Long-Run Effects of Bank Failures"

    Jordi Galí, CREI and NBER, "Uncovered Interest Parity, Forward Guidance and the Exchange Rate"

    Gabriel Chodorow-Reich, Harvard University and NBER; Loukas Karabarbounis, University of Minnesota and NBER; and Rohan Kekre, University of Chicago, "The Macroeconomics of the Greek Depression" (NBER Working Paper 25900)

    Javier Bianchi, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and NBER, and César Sosa-Padilla, University of Notre Dame, "Reserve Accumulation, Macroeconomic Stabilization and Sovereign Risk"

    Luis Felipe Céspedes, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, and Roberto Chang, Rutgers University and NBER, "Optimal Foreign Reserves and Central Bank Policy under Financial Stress"

    Jeremy Fouliard, London Business School; Michael Howell, CrossBorder Capital; and Hélène Rey, London Business School and NBER, "Answering the Queen: Machine Learning and Financial Crises"

    Wenxin Du, University of Chicago and NBER; Benjamin M. Hébert, Stanford University and NBER; and Amy Wang Huber, Stanford University, "Are Intermediary Constraints Priced?"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/IFMf19/summary.html

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Behavioral Finance

Members of the NBER's Behavioral Finance Working Group met November 1 in Cambridge. Research Associate Nicholas C. Barberis of Yale University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Peter D. Maxted, Harvard University, "A Macro-Finance Model with Sentiment"

    Francesco D'Acunto, Boston College; Ulrike Malmendier, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; Juan Ospina, University of Chicago; and Michael Weber, University of Chicago and NBER, "Exposure to Daily Price Changes and Inflation Expectations" (NBER Working Paper 26237)

    Samuel M. Hartzmark and Samuel D. Hirshman, University of Chicago, and Alex Imas, Carnegie Mellon University, "Ownership, Learning and Beliefs"

    Nicholas C. Barberis; Lawrence J. Jin, California Institute of Technology; and Baolian Wang, University of Florida, "Prospect Theory and Stock Market Anomalies"

    Lars A. Lochstoer, University of California, Los Angeles, and Tyler Muir, University of California, Los Angeles and NBER, "Volatility Expectations and Returns"

    Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham, Yale University, and Kelly Shue, Yale University and NBER, "The Gender Gap in Housing Returns"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/BFf19/summary.html

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Monetary Economics

Members of the NBER's Monetary Economics Program met November 1 in San Francisco. Faculty Research Fellows Adrien Auclert of Stanford University and Marco Di Maggio of Harvard University, and Program Directors Emi Nakamura and Jón Steinsson of the University of California, Berkeley organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Andrés Blanco, University of Michigan, and Isaac Baley, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, "Aggregate Dynamics in Lumpy Economies"

    Saki Bigio, University of California, Los Angeles and NBER, and Yuliy Sannikov, Stanford University, "A Model of Intermediation, Money, Interest, and Prices"

    Anthony A. DeFusco and John A. Mondragon, Northwestern University, "No Job, No Money, No Refi: Frictions to Refinancing in a Recession"

    Greg Buchak, Stanford University; Gregor Matvos, Northwestern University and NBER; Tomasz Piskorski, Columbia University and NBER; and Amit Seru, Stanford University and NBER, "The Limits of Shadow Banks" (NBER Working Paper 25149)

    Ian Dew-Becker, Northwestern University and NBER; Alireza Tahbaz-Salehi, Northwestern University; and Andrea Vedolin, Boston University and NBER, "Macro Skewness and Conditional Second Moments: Evidence and Theories"

    Rohan Kekre, University of Chicago, and Moritz Lenel, Princeton University, "Monetary Policy, Redistribution, and Risk Premia"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/MEf19/summary.html

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Labor Studies

Members of the NBER's Labor Studies Program met November 7–8 in Chicago. Program Directors David Autor of MIT and Alexandre Mas of Princeton University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Emily Breza, Harvard University and NBER; Supreet Kaur, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; and Yogita Shamdasani, University of Pittsburgh, "Labor Rationing: A Revealed Preference Approach from Hiring Shocks"

    Gizem Kosar, Federal Reserve Bank of New York; Ayşegül Şahin, University of Texas at Austin and NBER; and Basit Zafar, Arizona State University and NBER, "The Work-Leisure Tradeoff: Identifying the Heterogeneity"

    Paul Mohnen, University of Michigan, "The Impact of the Retirement Slowdown on the US Youth Labor Market"

    Henrik Kleven, Princeton University and NBER, "The EITC and the Extensive Margin: A Reappraisal" (NBER Working Paper 26405)

    Peter Q. Blair, Harvard University and NBER, and Benjamin Posmanick, Clemson University, "When Does Labor Market Flexibility Reduce Gender Wage Gaps?"

    Ellora Derenoncourt, Princeton University, and Claire Montialoux, University of California, Berkeley, "Minimum Wages and Racial Inequality"

    Stefano DellaVigna and Ulrike Malmendier, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; John A. List, University of Chicago and NBER; and Gautam Rao, Harvard University and NBER, "Estimating Social Preferences and Gift Exchange with a Piece-Rate Design"

    Brent R. Hickman, Washington University in St. Louis, and Jack Mountjoy, University of Chicago, "The Returns to College(s): Estimating Value-Added and Match Effects in Higher Education"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/LSf19/summary.html

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Organizational Economics

Members of the NBER's Organizational Economics Working Group met November 8–9 in Cambridge. Research Associate Robert S. Gibbons of MIT organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Dana Foarta and Takuo Sugaya, Stanford University, "Wait-and-See or Step In? Dynamics of Interventions"

    Canice Prendergast, University of Chicago, "Making A Difference"

    Mark J. Borgschulte, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Marius Guenzel, University of California, Berkeley; Canyao Liu, Yale University; and Ulrike Malmendier, University of California, Berkeley and NBER, "CEO Stress and Life Expectancy: The Role of Corporate Governance and Financial Distress"

    Francesco Decarolis and Paolo Pinotti, Bocconi University; Raymond Fisman, Boston University and NBER; and Silvia Vannutelli, Boston University, "Rules, Discretion, and Corruption in Procurement: Evidence from Italian Government Contracting"

    Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University and NBER; Michael Christensen and Jan Rivkin, Harvard University; Raffaella Sadun, Harvard University and NBER; and Mu-Jeung Yang, University of Utah, "How Do CEOs Make Strategy?"

    Raúl Sanchez de la Sierra, University of Chicago and NBER, and Kristof Titeca, University of Antwerp, "Corruption in Hierarchies"

    Chen Cheng and Yiqing Xing, Johns Hopkins University, and Wei Huang, National University of Singapore, "A Theory of Multiplexity: Sustaining Cooperation with Multiple Relationships"

    Ernst Fehr and Ivo Schurtenberger, University of Zurich, "The Dynamics of Norm Formation and Norm Decay"

    Giuseppe Berlingieri, ESSEC Business School and CEP; Frank Pisch, University of St. Gallen; and Claudia Steinwender, MIT and NBER, "Organizing Global Supply Chains: Input-Output Linkages and Vertical Integration" (NBER Working Paper 25286)

    W. Bentley MacLeod, Columbia University and NBER, and Victoria Valle Lara and Christian Zehnder, University of Lausanne, "On Building a Conflict Culture in Organizations"

    Katherine Casey, Stanford University and NBER; Edward Miguel, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; Rachel Glennerster, UK Department for International Development; and Maarten J. Voors, Wageningen University & Research, "Skill versus Voice in Local Development" (NBER Working Paper 25022)

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/OEf19/summary.html

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Corporate Finance

Members of the NBER's Corporate Finance Program met November 8 at Stanford University. Research Associates John Graham of Duke University and Paola Sapienza of Northwestern University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Matthew Smith, Department of the Treasury; Owen M. Zidar, Princeton University and NBER; and Eric Zwick, University of Chicago and NBER, "Top Wealth in America: New Estimates and Implications for Taxing the Rich"

    Simon Jäger, MIT and NBER; Benjamin Schoefer, University of California, Berkeley; and Jörg Heining, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt und Berufsforschung, "Labor in the Boardroom"

    Jean-Noël Barrot, MIT; Thorsten Martin, HEC Paris; Julien Sauvagnat, Bocconi University; and Boris Vallée, Harvard University, "Employment Effects of Alleviating Financing Frictions: Worker-level Evidence from a Loan Guarantee Program"

    Ankit Kalda, Indiana University; Marco Di Maggio, Harvard University and NBER; and Vincent Yao, Georgia State University, "Second Chance: Life without Student Debt" (NBER Working Paper 25810)

    Holger Mueller, New York University and NBER, and Constantine Yannelis, University of Chicago and NBER, "Reducing Barriers to Enrollment in Federal Student Loan Repayment Plans: Evidence from the Navient Field Experiment"

    Winston Wei Dou and Lucian A. Taylor, University of Pennsylvania; Wei Wang, Queens University; and Wenyu Wang, Indiana University, "Dissecting Bankruptcy Frictions"

    Francesco D'Acunto, Boston College; Ulrike Malmendier, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; and Michael Weber, University of Chicago and NBER, "Gender Roles Distort Women's Economic Outlook"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/CFf19/summary.html

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Asset Pricing

Members of the NBER's Asset Pricing Program met November 8 at Stanford University. Research Associates Stefano Giglio of Yale University and Tarek Alexander Hassan of Boston University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Matthew Smith, Department of Treasury; Owen M. Zidar, Princeton University and NBER; and Eric Zwick, University of Chicago and NBER, "Top Wealth in the United States: New Estimates and Implications for Taxing the Rich"

    Juan Morelli and Diego Perez, New York University, and Pablo Ottonello, University of Michigan and NBER, "Global Banks and Systemic Debt Crises"

    Wenxin Du, University of Chicago and NBER; Benjamin M. Hébert, Stanford University and NBER; and Amy Wang Huber, Stanford University, "Are Intermediary Constraints Priced?" (NBER Working Paper 26009)

    Martin Lettau, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; Sydney C. Ludvigson, New York University and NBER; and Paulo Martins Manoel, University of California, Berkeley, "Characteristics of Mutual Fund Portfolios: Where Are the Value Funds?" (NBER Working Paper 25381)

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/APf19/summary.html

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Education

Members of the NBER's Education Program met November 14–15 in Cambridge. Program Director Caroline M. Hoxby of Stanford University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    C. Kirabo Jackson, Northwestern University and NBER, and Diether Beuermann, Inter-American Development Bank, "Do Parents Know Best? The Short and Long-Run Effects of Attending the Schools That Parents Prefer"

    (NBER Working Paper 24920)

    Richard Murphy, University of Texas at Austin and NBER; Simon Burgess, University of Bristol; and Ellen Greaves, Institute for Fiscal Studies, "Deregulating Teacher Labor Markets"

    Cher Li, Colorado State University, and Basit Zafar, Arizona State University and NBER, "Ask and You Shall Receive? Gender Differences in Regrades in College"

    Peter Bergman, Columbia University; Eric W. Chan, Babson College; and Adam Kapor, Princeton University and NBER, "Housing Search Frictions: Evidence from Detailed Search Data and a Field Experiment"

    Kevin Mumford, Purdue University, "Student Selection into an Income Share Agreement"

    Andrew Foote, US Census Bureau, and Kevin M. Stange, University of Michigan and NBER, "Attrition from Administrative Data: Problems and Solutions with an Application to Higher Education"

    Christopher Neilson and Franco A. Calle, Princeton University, and Sebastian Gallegos, Inter-American Development Bank, "Screening and Recruiting Talent at Teacher Colleges Using Pre-College Academic Achievement"

    Kelli A. Bird and Benjamin L. Castleman, University of Virginia; Jeffrey T. Denning, Brigham Young University; Joshua Goodman, Brandeis University and NBER; Cait Lamberton, University of Pittsburgh; and Kelly Ochs Rosinger, Pennsylvania State University, "Nudging at Scale: Experimental Evidence from FAFSA Completion Campaigns" (NBER Working Paper 26158)

    Philip Oreopoulos, University of Toronto and NBER, and Uros Petronijevic, York University, "The Remarkable Unresponsiveness of College Students to Nudging and What We Can Learn from It" (NBER Working Paper 26059)

    Phillip B. Levine, Wellesley College and NBER; Jennifer Ma, College Board; and Lauren C. Russell, University of Pennsylvania, "Do College Applicants Respond to Changes in Sticker Prices Even When They Don't Matter?"

    Eric Brunner and Stephen Ross, University of Connecticut, and Shaun Dougherty, Vanderbilt University, "The Effects of Career and Technical Education: Evidence from the Connecticut Technical High School System"

    Barbara Biasi, Yale University and NBER, "Higher Salaries or Higher Pensions? Inferring Preferences from Teachers' Retirement Behavior"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/EDf19/summary.html

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Development Economics/BREAD

A joint meeting of the NBER's Development Economics Program and BREAD (Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development) was held November 22–23 in Cambridge. Oriana Bandiera and Robin Burgess of the London School of Economics, Research Associates Melissa Dell of Harvard University, Edward Miguel of the University of California, Berkeley and Dean Yang of the University of Michigan, and Program Directors Seema Jayachandran of Northwestern University and Benjamin A. Olken of MIT organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Katherine Casey, Stanford University and NBER, and Niccoló Meriggi and Abou Bakarr Kamara, International Growth Centre, "An Experiment in Candidate Selection" (NBER Working Paper 26160)

    Siddharth E. George, Harvard University, "Like Father, Like Son? The Effect of Political Dynasties on Economic Development"

    Vittorio Bassi, University of Southern California; Tommaso Porzio, Columbia University; Ritwika Sen, Northwestern University; and Raffaela Muoio and Esau Tugume, BRAC Uganda, "Achieving Scale Collectively"

    Clare Leaver, University of Oxford; Owen Ozier, The World Bank; Pieter M. Serneels, University of East Anglia; and Andrew F. Zeitlin, Georgetown University, "Recruitment, Effort, and Retention Effects of Performance Contracts for Civil Servants: Experimental Evidence from Rwandan Primary Schools"

    Richard Hornbeck, University of Chicago and NBER, and Martin Rotemberg, New York University, "Railroads, Reallocation, and the Rise of American Manufacturing"

    Adam Aberra and Matthieu Chemin, McGill University, "Does Legal Representation Increase Investment? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya"

    Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, MIT and NBER; Arun G. Chandrasekhar, Stanford University and NBER; and Matthew Jackson, Stanford University, "Changes in Social Network Structure in Response to Exposure to Formal Credit Markets"

    Emily Breza, Harvard University and NBER; Supreet Kaur, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; and Yogita Shamdasani, University of Pittsburgh, "Labor Rationing: A Revealed Preference Approach from Hiring Shocks"

    Matti Mitrunen, University of Chicago, "Structural Change and Intergenerational Mobility: Evidence from the Finnish War Reparations"

    Dennis Egger and Michael W. Walker, University of California, Berkeley; Johannes Haushofer, Princeton University and NBER; Paul Niehaus, University of California, San Diego and NBER; Edward Miguel, "General Equilibrium Welfare Effects of Cash Transfers: Experimental Evidence from Kenya"

    Monica Martinez-Bravo and Andreas Stegmann, Centro de Estudios Monetarios y Financieros (CEMFI), "In Vaccines We Trust? The Effects of the CIA's Vaccine Ruse on Immunization in Pakistan"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/DEVf19/summary.html

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Health Care

Members of the NBER's Health Care Program met December 6 in Cambridge. Program Director Jonathan Gruber of MIT and Research Associates Leemore Dafny of Harvard University, Benjamin R. Handel of the University of California, Berkeley, and Neale Mahoney of the University of Chicago organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Shooshan Danagoulian, Wayne State University; Daniel S. Grossman, West Virginia University; and David Slusky, University of Kansas, "Office Visits Preventing Emergency Room Visits: Evidence from the Flint Water Switch"

    Liran Einav, Stanford University and NBER; Amy Finkelstein, MIT and NBER; Yunan Ji, Harvard University; and Neale Mahoney, "Voluntary Regulation: Evidence from Medicare Payment Reform"

    Pierre-Thomas Léger and Wu Jiashan, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Robert Town, University of Texas, Austin and NBER, "A Theory of Geographic Variations in Medical Care"

    Richard Domurat, University of California, Los Angeles; Isaac Menashe, Covered California; and Wesley Yin, University of California, Los Angeles and NBER, "The Role of Behavioral Frictions in Health Insurance Marketplace Enrollment and Risk: Evidence from a Field Experiment" (NBER Working Paper 26153)

    Diane E. Alexander, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and Molly Schnell, Northwestern University and NBER, "The Impacts of Physician Payments on Patient Access, Use, and Health" (NBER Working Paper 26095)

    Abby E. Alpert, University of Pennsylvania and NBER; William N. Evans and Ethan Lieber, University of Notre Dame and NBER; and David Powell, RAND Corporation, "Origins of the Opioid Crisis and Its Enduring Impacts"

    Benjamin R. Handel and Jonathan T. Kolstad, University of California, Berkeley and NBER, and Thomas Minten and Johannes Spinnewijn, London School of Economics, "The Social Determinants of Choice Quality: Evidence from Health Insurance in the Netherlands"

    Yiqun Chen, Stanford University, and Petra Persson and Maria Polyakova, Stanford University and NBER, "The Roots of Health Inequality and the Value of Intra-Family Expertise" (NBER Working Paper 25618)

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/HCf19/summary.html

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Entrepreneurship

Members of the NBER's Entrepreneurship Working Group met December 6 in Cambridge. Program Director Josh Lerner of Harvard University and Research Associate David T. Robinson of Duke University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Kristoph Kleiner and Isaac Hacamo, Indiana University, "Confidence Spillovers in Competitive Environments: Evidence from Entrepreneurship"

    Johan Hombert, HEC Paris, and Adrien Matray, Princeton University, "Technology Boom, Labor Reallocation, and Human Capital Depreciation"

    Barbara Biasi, Yale University and NBER, and Song Ma, Yale University, "The Education-Innovation Gap"

    Thomas F. Hellmann, University of Oxford and NBER, and Nir Vulkan, University of Oxford, "Be Careful What You Ask For: Fundraising Strategies in Equity Crowdfunding" (NBER Working Paper 26275)

    Olav Sorenson and Rodrigo Canales, Yale University; Michael Dahl, Aarhus University; and M. Diane Burton, Cornell University, "Do Startup Employees Earn More in the Long Run?"

    Juanita González-Uribe, London School of Economics, and Santiago Reyes, Inter-American Development Bank, "Identifying and Boosting "Gazelles"

    : Evidence from Business Accelerators"

    Aymeric Bellon, University of Pennsylvania; J. Anthony Cookson, University of Colorado; Erik P. Gilje, University of Pennsylvania and NBER; and Rawley Z. Heimer, Boston College, "Personal Wealth and Self-Employment"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/ENTf19/summary.html

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International Trade and Investment

Members of the NBER's International Trade and Investment Program met December 6–7 at Stanford University. Program Director Stephen J. Redding of Princeton University organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

    Dominick G. Bartelme and Ting Lan, University of Michigan, and Andrei A. Levchenko, University of Michigan and NBER, "Specialization, Market Access and Real Income"

    Joseph S. Shapiro, University of California, Berkeley and NBER, "The Environmental Bias of Trade Policy"

    Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, University of California, Berkeley and NBER; Mauricio Ulate, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; and José P. Vásquez, University of California, Berkeley, "New-Keynesian Trade: Understanding the Employment and Welfare Effects of Sector-Level Shocks"

    Nezih Guner, CEMFI; Alessandro Ruggieri, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Barcelona GSE; and James R. Tybout, Pennsylvania State University and NBER, "Trade, Offshoring, and the Job Ladder"

    Costas Arkolakis and Michael Peters, Yale University and NBER, and Sun K. Lee, Columbia University, "European Immigrants and the United States' Rise to the Technological Frontier in the 19th Century"

    Bradley Setzler, University of Chicago, and Felix Tintelnot, University of Chicago and NBER, "The Effects of Foreign Multinationals on Workers and Firms in the United States" (NBER Working Paper 26149)

    Alejandro G. Graziano, University of Maryland; Kyle Handley, University of Michigan and NBER; and Nuno Limão, University of Maryland and NBER, "Brexit Uncertainty and Trade Disintegration" (NBER Working Paper 25334)

    Vanessa I. Alviarez, University of British Columbia; Javier Cravino, University of Michigan and NBER; and Natalia Ramondo, University of California, San Diego and NBER, "Accounting for Cross-Country Income Differences: New Evidence from Multinational Firms"

    Wulong Gu, Statistics Canada; Alla Lileeva, York University; and Daniel Trefler, University of Toronto and NBER, "Global Sourcing from Low-Wage Countries: Implications for R&D and Employment"

Summaries of these papers are at www.nber.org/conferences/2019/ITIf19/summary.html

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